Researcher Profile > College of International Management> CLASTER William B.
College of International Management

Professor

CLASTER William B.
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Books Number of the published data : 5
No. Title Publication date
1 Springer Publications: Data Science Mathematics Fundamentals with R: Implementing Naïve Bayes, Neural... 2018/12
Title Springer Publications: Data Science Mathematics Fundamentals with R: Implementing Naïve Bayes, Neural Network, and Deep Learning Algorithms
Publisher
Pages that you were responsible for
Joint authors
ISBN
Summary
 
2 "Tourism and Social Media: Algorithmic Text Analysis Methodologies in Tourism & Hospitality,"... 2014/12
Title "Tourism and Social Media: Algorithmic Text Analysis Methodologies in Tourism & Hospitality," chapter to appear in Encyclopedia of Information Science and Technology
Publisher IGI Global
Pages that you were responsible for DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-5888-2, ISBN13: 9781466658882, ISBN1
Joint authors Malcolm Cooper, Phillip Pardo
ISBN 9781466658882
Summary
Release Date: July, 2014
 
3 Data-mining techniques for an analysis of non-conventional methodologies; deciphering of alternative... 2010/03
Title Data-mining techniques for an analysis of non-conventional methodologies; deciphering of alternative medicine in the Asia Pacific region to be published in Biomedical Knowledge Management
Publisher Infrastructures and Processes for E-Health Systems, IGI Press
Pages that you were responsible for chapter 6: 82-91
Joint authors William Claster, Nader Ghotbi
ISBN 1605662666
Summary
Some common methodologies in our everyday life are not based on modern scientific knowledge but rather a set of experiences that have established themselves through years of practice. As a good example, there are many forms of alternative medicine, quite popular, however difficult to comprehend by conventional western medicine. The diagnostic and therapeutic methodologies are very different and sometimes unique, compared to that of western medicine. How can we verify and analyze such methodologies through modern scientific methods? We present a case study where data-mining was able to fill this gap and provide us with many tools for investigation. Osteopathy is a popular alternative medicine methodology to treat musculoskeletal complaints in Japan. Using data-mining methodologies, we could overcome some of the analytical problems in an investigation. We studied diagnostic records from a very popular osteopathy clinic in Osaka, Japan that included over 30,000 patient visits over 6 years of practice. The data consists of some careful measurements of tissue electro-conductivity differences at 5 anatomical positions. Data mining and knowledge discovery algorithms were applied to search for meaningful associations within the patient data elements recorded. This study helped us scientifically investigate the diagnostic methodology adopted by the osteopath.
 
4 The use of public health surveillance data for the preventive control of diseases transmitted based on... 2008/08
Title The use of public health surveillance data for the preventive control of diseases transmitted based on individual choices: The case of HIV infection in the Asia Pacific region to be published in Biomedical Knowledge Management: Infrastructures and Processes for E-Health Systems, IGI Press, 2008, Claster William, Nader Ghotbi.
Publisher IGI Press
Pages that you were responsible for 232-241
Joint authors Nader Ghotbi, Claster William
ISBN 1605662666
Summary
E-health systems can be used to communicate the risk of significant infectious diseases such as HIV infection to individuals who contemplate taking the risk of the personal behavioral choices they make. Access
to an on-line system which communicates this data in a user-friendly format, can help avoid high-risk
behavior by informed individuals who live in different areas with various levels of risk. We present the
case of HIV infection in Japan where many individuals have voluntarily continued a high-risk behavior
because apparently they consider the overall risk of infection too low to forgo the personal benefits of
risky behavior such as more pleasure, less inconvenience, etc. We discuss how a user friendly e-health
system can provide geographical risk data that are extracted from HIV epidemiological surveillance.
This can provide individuals with a rational incentive for behavior change in high-risk areas. It is hoped
that such a system helps with the control of not only HIV, but also other agents of disease in situations
where individual choices play a significant role in the risk of exposure/disease.
 
5 The Use of Artificial Intelligence Systems for Support of Medical Decision-Making. 2008/01
Title The Use of Artificial Intelligence Systems for Support of Medical Decision-Making.
Publisher IGI Press, Biomedical Knowledge Management: Infrastructures and Processes for E-Health Systems
Pages that you were responsible for 18-30
Joint authors Claster William, Nader Ghotbi
ISBN 1605662666
Summary
Text Mining of medical records